Yep-that's old school for ya

I'm a lifer. 

No---I'm not in prison.  I'm at work.  And I love my job.  Part of the reason why is the absolute stupefication I get when I get on a roll talking about "the good ole days".  You know, all those completely 'normal' things we did when I first started working in the veterinary industry many moons ago. (18 to be exact).  We sent off some OFA x-rays last week for evaluation and somewhere betweend Idaho and Missouri and a post office someone decided to spill some unknown substance on the mailer.  Consequently, the paperwork was literally GLUED to the film.  Nice.  Keep in mind the dog in question is a super spastic lab and the thought of wrestling him down again for x-rays is challenging, to say the least (and that was just give him him his drugs!).  Thankfully, we had taken 2 films (which we normally don't do) and easy peasy, problem solved. Me in my curiosity wanted to see just what in the world would remove that paper so I got out several "test" solutions to see what would work.  The second one I tried was plain ol' water.  I remembered the days of old where we would dip undeveloped film in developer, water, fixer, water.  Sure enough, the paper came off with no problem, but the weird sticky residue remained.  As I gloated and showed off how smart I was, the girls questioned how I would be so brilliant as to know to try water. 

"Well, years ago we had hand tanks for our x-rays", and I explained the process of dipping here, dipping there and hanging up film--all in a room the size of a small closet.  The baffled looks were amazing.  They uttered 'hand tanks' amongst themselves like it was a vile word.  I'm not even sure they believed me.  Thankfully, I've got another gal there that used to work for a Cali doctor that was "old school" so she backed up my story.  Since I was on a roll of disbelief, I told them how much fun it used to be recycling surgical gloves.   "Surgical gloves--really?"  They really thought I was full of hooey at this point. So again, I explained the process: wash gloves, hang gloves to dry, turn gloves inside out, let gloves dry again, instill baby powder, blow air into gloves to coat baby powder, pair up gloves and put back in paper sleeves for sterilization.  Jaws were open at this point.  Then I told them how we used to re-use needles.  We would check for 'sharp edges' and if ok, recap and re-auctoclave.  (I can see OSHA having a fit just by reading this!).  "How did you do that?" they enquired with awe.  I explained how we would clean the needles and then run the edge of the needle over the back of our hand and if it 'caught' on us, then it was no good and we would dispose.  Otherwise, they were good to go and back to the back for the autoclave.   I also shared with them how this task was much less frightening than re-using fecal cups.....which I had one doctor do.  I shudder just thinking about it. Thankfully, we "accidently" threw away as many as we could get away with.....I think he might have finally caught on......

By this time, I had a rapt audience. Silence hung around the room as I wove my stories of old.  I just smiled at all of them and told them how good they had it and walked away leaving them tittering about the past. 

I can't wait to see what tricks I'll learn over the next 15 years!

 

Comments




  • LOL! Yuppers, I remember washing/autoclaving 3cc syringes and needles. And microscope slides(by the way, that may be fine for fecals, but you can't do a blood smear on a handwashed slide). Thank the good doGs that my boss decided years ago he thought more of his staff than to pay them to do that kind of stuff! There are advantages to hand dip tanks...if your solutions are old, and you've been too busy to change them...you can adjust your time, for better films. While I love our automatic processor, there isn't that chance for human adjustment! I've been in the profession for over 30 years now...LOTS of things have changed, most of them for the better. But there were alot of good things about the "good old days".
    kathyrvt, 6 years ago | Flag

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